Social Studies

Summary

The goal of the Social Studies department is to educate students as informed citizens in a democratic society, help them function in a market economy, increase their understanding of the role of the United States in a global society, and to prepare them for further education or job training.  These goals will be achieved through the successful completion of a variety of courses.

Summary of courses offered appears below, with specific course descriptions in the pages that follow.

Course / Grade / Credit / Weight / Classification / Special Note

Global History / 9 / 9 / 1.0 / 1.0 / Regents

Global History 9 Honors / 9 / 1.0 / 1.05 /  Regents / Must be selected for class

Global History 10 / 10 / 1.0 / 1.0 / Regents / Regents examination

Global History 10 Honors / 10 / 1.0 / 1.05 / Regents / Must be selected for class

U.S. History & Government / 11 / 1.0 / 1.0 / Regents / Regents examination

AP American History 11 / 1.0 / 1.1 / AP, Elective / AP examination required

AP Comparative Gov’t & Politics  / 11-12 / 1.0/  1.1 / AP, Elective / AP examination required

U.S. History To 1865* / 11 / 3.0 / 1.1 / CCHS / CCHS, prerequisites

U.S. History Since 1865* / 11 / 3.0 / 1.1 / CCHS / CCHS, prerequisites

U.S. Government – National** / 12 / 3.0 / 1.1 / CCHS / CCHS, prerequisites

Macro-economics** / 12 / 3.0 / 1.1 / SUPA / SUPA, prerequisites

Participation in American Gov’t / 12 / 0.5 / 1.0 / Required

Economics / 12 / 0.5 / 1.0 / Required

For more information about the Advanced Placement and Community College in the High School program, click here. CCHS classes require tuition, books and fees paid by student.

* Meets State requirements for 11th  grade social studies requirement.

** Meets State requirements for 12th grade social studies requirement

Social Studies Course Descriptions

Global History 9
Grade 9
1 credit

This full year course will focus on World History from the development of early river valley civilizations up to the political, economic, social and intellectual upheavals of the eighteenth century.  The course concludes with a district final examination.

 

Global History 9 Honors
Grade 9
1 Credit

Similar in content and skills development to Global History and Geography I, this course will consider     more topics in depth and provide opportunities for researching additional topics beyond required ones. The materials and assignments are more rigorous than the Regents level course. Cross cultural connections between Western and the non-Western worlds will be emphasized as part of the New York State standards of geography, history, economics and government. Students will analyze and evaluate historical documents, and will write descriptive and comparative essays on turning points in world history.  The course concludes with a district final examination.

 

Global History 10*
Grade 10
1 credit

This one-year course chronologically traces World History from the political, economic and social upheaval of the 18th century and traces development to the present day.  Stress will be given to the understanding of the key forces of nationalism, imperialism and industrialization and how they helped to mold the modern world we live in. The course concludes with the Regents examination in Global History and Geography.

 

Global History 10 Honors*
Grade 10
1 credit

This course will consider more topics in depth and provide opportunities for researching additional topics beyond those required.   Students will analyze and evaluate historical documents, and will write descriptive and comparative essays on turning points in world history.  The course concludes with the Regents examination in Global History and Geography.

*Note:  NYSED is shifting the focus of the Regents examination in Global History and Geography to that of enduring themes.  These themes include, but are not limited to: political, economic, social and religious themes of the world, outside the United States.

 

U. S. History and Government
Grade 11
1 credit

This course examines United States History, stressing conceptual understandings of main themes, or factors that combined to form the modern American society. Emphasis is placed on: constitutional law and the evaluation and use of the United States legal system, the operation of the United States and state governments under the constitution, the practice of politics, the role of immigration in the development of the United States, the Puritanical history of New England on American cultures, the development of American Foreign Policy, the evolution of civil rights from slavery to the present day, the economic basis of American society, and current issues.  The course culminates in the New York State Regents examination in U. S. History and Government.

 

Advanced Placement American History
Grade 11
1 credit

This is a college level course designed to help students develop an understanding of American History and institutions. After successfully completing an examination, a student may earn college credit for this course.  Students are also required to take the New York State Regents examination in U.S. History and Government.

 

Advanced Placement Comparative Government and Politics
Grade 11 – 12
1 credit

This is a college level course designed to help students gain knowledge of the world’s diverse political structures and practices.  The course focuses on the study of both specific countries and general concepts used to interpret the key political relationships found in virtually all national politics. Six countries form the core of the course, which include: Great Britain, Russia, China, Iran, Mexico and Nigeria. These countries provide examples of differing political systems.  A new stress on globalization is central to comparing and contrasting these political systems.  College credit can be obtained upon successful completion of the AP examination.

 

U. S. History To 1865
Grade 11
3 credits

Prerequisites:

  • Either a grade of 85% or higher on the NYS Regents Examination in Global History or
  • A combination of a class average of 85% or higher in the Global History course and a grade of 80% or better on the NYS Regents Examination in Global History or
  • The recommendation of the course teacher or the Principal for the student’s provisional placement in the course.

This course is a study of the political, intellectual, economic and cultural developments of the United States from earliest colonial settlements to the Civil War.  Topics include the Puritan mind, regional cultural patterns, the evolution of constitutional law and the struggle for independence, the Hamiltonian and Jeffersonian perspectives, expansion, slavery, and the Civil War.  High levels of analytical thinking and excellent writing skills are essential.

 

U. S. History Since 1865
Grade 11
3 credits

Prerequisites:

  • A passing score of “C” in US History To 1865, or
  • The recommendation of the teacher or the Principal for the provisional placement of the student in the class.

This course surveys the Reconstruction Era within the context of the 13th, 14th, and 15th Amendments and their impacts and interpretations.  An examination of the issues inherent in the change from an agrarian to an industrial society, the course focuses on dislocations in rural America, the rise of cities, immigration, and the labor movement.  An assessment of twentieth century U.S. participation in world events, and the balance of power between the superpowers and Third World nations are included.

 

Macro-Economics
Grade 12
3 credits

Prerequisites: 

  • A course average of 80% or higher in the most recent Math course completed by the student or
  • The recommendation of the teacher or Principal for the student’s provisional placement in the class.

“Chocolate or vanilla?”, “Rent or buy?”, “Support a strong or weak dollar?” Our lives-from the micro and personal to the macro and political-are consumed by choices.

How and why we make choices-and the consequences of them-is the subject of Macro-Economics.

This course examines Western economic thought by starting with a one-person society and asks how this person makes choices, especially when other individuals are introduced and resources become scarce.  Our journey leads us to the complex, industrialized society we live in today.

In Macro-Economics you will…

  • Learn how micro and macro-economic theory affects our personal lives.
  • Investigate the role governments play in creating and solving global economic challenges.
  • Become a more engaged citizen by gaining a better understanding of financial policy.

 

US Government National
Grade 12
3 credits

Prerequisites:

  • Either a grade of 85% or higher on the NYS Regents Examination in U.S. History and Government or
  • A combination of a class average of 85% or higher in the U.S. History course and a grade of 80% or better on the NYS Regents Examination in U.S. History and Government or
  • The recommendation of the course teacher or the Principal for the student’s provisional placement in the course

This course offers an introduction to political processes in nations other than the United States.  The course uses the comparative method to analyze such topics as political culture, developed vs. developing nations, the organization of governments, political parties, and the operation of interest groups.  Focus will include an analysis of industrialized democracies, former communist societies making monumental transitions to democracy and capitalism and developing political systems in the non-western and western world.

 

Participation in American Government
Grade 12
½ credits

This course explores the principles of American Government and civic participation.  Emphasis is placed on understanding important issues and policy making which leads to an appreciation of the practical operation of government.

 

Economics
Grade 12
½ credits

The goal of this course is to provide students with a basic understanding of macro-economic concepts.  Economic analysis and critical thinking skills are emphasized through the study of economic models and current economic problems.